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Your account details

What is your current job title?

What is your career stage?

Do you work as a freelancer?

What is your current availability?

Where do you fit in the screen industries?

Tag industries you work in

How did you learn about ScreenSkills (previously Hiive or Creative Skillset)?

Your personal information

ScreenSkills strives to be an inclusive organisation and is determined to meet the aims and commitments set in our diversity and equal opportunities policy, which is in line with the Equality Act 2010. The policy includes creating a workforce that reflects the diversity of the UK and encouraging diversity and inclusivity in the screen industries.

You can help us by completing this form. If you prefer not to, then please select that option when filling in your form. But it is difficult for ScreenSkills to improve diversity and inclusivity when we do not know who is out there.

All of the information we collect is processed in accordance with General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and any other applicable data protection legislation in the UK. No third parties will be given access to the personal information provided unless we are required by law to do so. For more information explaining how we use your data please see the privacy policy, cookies policy and website terms and conditions.

What is your date of birth?

Why do we ask this question?

According to a parliamentary report in 2018, the UK’s youth unemployment rate is 11%. In Ofcom’s Diversity in TV report 2018 states that while 31% of the working age population in the UK is over the age of 50, only 16% of employees in the screen industries is aged 50-64 years old. To improve employment opportunities by age group, the Office of National Statistics recommends requesting a date of birth on monitoring forms. Accumulated data can be assessed in age brackets according to standard census classification, as follows (We have replaced ‘<16’ with ‘0-15’ and ‘65’ with ‘65+’):

  • 0-15
  • 16-24
  • 25-29
  • 30-34
  • 35-39
  • 40-44
  • 45-49
  • 50-54
  • 55-59
  • 60-65
  • 65+

Disability

The Equality Act 2010 defines disability as ‘a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial & long term effect on a person’s ability to carry out normal day to day activities’. Do you consider yourself to have a disability, impairment, learning difference or long-term condition?

What best describes your disability, impairment, learning difference or long-term condition? Please tick all that apply

Why do we ask this question?

According to a parliamentary report only 50.7% of people of working age (16-64) with disabilities were employed in 2018, compared to 81.1% of people without disabilities. In Ofcom’s Diversity in TV report 2018, only 6% of employees self-defined as having a disability but this is extremely low compared to the UK average figure of 18%. The government launched the Disability Confident campaign in 2014 to encourage UK employers to recruit and retain disabled staff and regularly publish the list of employers signed up to the scheme. To monitor and improve employment opportunities for disabled talent, this question was devised in consultation with the Business Disability Forum and drafted from guidance given by their Information and Advice Service.

What best describes your ethnic group?

Asian/Asian British

Black/African/Caribbean/Black British

Mixed/multiple ethnic groups

White

Other ethnic group

Prefer not to say my ethnicity

Why do we ask this question?

According to a parliamentary report the UK unemployment rate was 6.3% for people from BAME (black, Asian and minority ethnic) backgrounds compared to 3.6% for people from a white background. Among people aged 16-24, unemployment rates were highest for people from a black background (26%) and from a Pakistani or Bangladeshi background (23%) in March 2018. This compared to a rate of 11% for people aged 16-24 from a white background.

According to Ofcom’s Diversity in TV report 2018, 13% of employees in the screen industries are from minority ethnic backgrounds. This figure is extremely low given that 40% of the population in London and the South East has a minority ethnic background. At the same time many jobs in the screen industries are located in London and the South East. In production 65% of employees are London-based for example. Minority ethnic employees are also under-represented across content and creative roles and at a senior management level minority representation levels have not improved for years.

In addition, a recent report from Animation UK (2018) suggests that 6% of the UK animation workforce are from a BAME background and that 94% are white. To monitor and improve employment opportunities for people from different ethnic backgrounds this question was devised in consultation with ACAS and categories are established by Office of National Statistics.

What best describes your gender?

Why do we ask this question?

A parliamentary report stated that the female employment rate was 70.8% compared to 79.7% for men in 2017.According to Ofcom’s 2018 Diversity in TV report 46% of employees are women, but they only hold 41% of senior management positions. The Work Foundation’s 2017 report found that only 20% of ‘key production staff’ are women and Nesta found that women represented only 34% of off-screen roles in UK film crews in 2017. Finally, Animation UK (2018) reported that women represent 40% of the animation workforce. To monitor and improve employment and training opportunities for women, this question was devised in consultation with ACAS and the categories are taken from the ACAS Equality and Diversity Monitoring Form.

Do you identify as trans?

Why do we ask this question?

According to Stonewall’s LGBT in Britain: Trans Report 2017, one in eight trans employees (12%) have been physically attacked by colleagues or customers in the last year, and half of trans and non-binary people (51% and 50% respectively) have hidden or disguised the fact that they are LGBT at work because they were afraid of discrimination. In order to monitor and improve the workplace experience of trans people, this question was devised in consultation with Stonewall and taken from their guidance Do Ask, Do Tell: Capturing data on sexual orientation and gender identity globally.

What best describes your sexual orientation?

Why do we ask this question?

According to Stonewall’s LGBT in Britain: Work report 2018, almost one in five LGBT people (18%) who were looking for work said they were discriminated against because of their sexual orientation and/or gender identity while trying to get a job in the last year. More than a third of LGBT staff (35%) have hidden or disguised that they are LGBT at work in the last year because they were afraid of discrimination. To monitor and improve workplace experience for LGBT people, this question was devised in consultation with Stonewall and taken from their guidance Do Ask, Do Tell: Capturing data on sexual orientation and gender identity globally.

What best describes your religion or belief?

Why do we ask this question?

According to a parliamentary report in 2016, Muslims have the lowest employment rate at 47.2% of all religious groups and face the highest pay gap compared with those of no religion, earning 22.5% less. Only 16% are in managerial and professional roles, against an average of 30% of the general population. This question was devised using Office of National Statistics categories to monitor and improve employment opportunities.

What type of school did you mainly attend between the ages of 11 and 16?

Why do we ask this question?

This question was devised in consultation with Bridge Group and taken from their guidance in 2018 Ofcom report Diversity and Equal Opportunities in Television.

What work did your parent/caregiver do?

Please think about the parent or other care-giver who was the highest income earner in your house when you were around 14 years old. What kind of work did they do? If this question does not apply to you (because for example, you were in care at this time), you can indicate this below.

Why do we ask this question?

This question was devised in consultation with Bridge Group and taken from their guidance in 2018 Ofcom report Diversity and Equal Opportunities in Television.

What is your current UK postcode?

Why do we ask this question?

Findings from the Work Foundation (2017) suggest that 65% of the UK’s film production workforce is located in London and the South East.

In which area of the UK did you predominantly grow up?

Please choose region in England

Why do we ask this question?

Findings from the Work Foundation (2017) suggest that 65% of the UK’s film production workforce is located in London and the South East.

Do you have caring responsibilities?

If yes, please tick all that apply

Why do we ask this question?

This question was devised in consultation with ACAS and taken from the ACAS Equality and Diversity Monitoring Form.

Return to work

Are you returning to work following an extended period (12 months or more) of absence?

If yes, select one of the following

Why do we ask this question?

According to the Women’s Business Council report estimates, 2.4 million women are not working and want to work while a further 1.3 million want to increase their hours. Three in five professional women returning to the workforce are likely to move into lower-skilled or lower-paid roles following their career breaks (PWC 2016 Women Returners: The £1 billion career break penalty for professional women). As the government is committed to supporting those who want to return to the labour market having taken a break to care for others (‘returners’), the Government Equalities Office published Employer research on returner programmes research report in March 2018 to build an evidence base on how to help returners. This question was devised in consultation with Carers UK.

Employment

In the past 12 months, what has been your employment status for the majority of that time?

Why do we ask this question?

The government defines different types of work according to employment status. For example if a person is self-employed, their rights and responsibilities are set out by the terms of the contract they have with their client, protecting them from health and safety risks at work and against discrimination. The BFI (2017) found that 27,000 people, or 49% of the UK’s film and video production workforce, were self-employed in 2016. In Ofcom’s Diversity in TV report 2018, freelancers remain largely unmonitored and the regulator has called for the main broadcasters to address this as a priority. This question was devised in consultation with the ScreenSkills research team in order to monitor and improve employment opportunities for freelancers. It uses the terminology that is also used by ACAS.

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Terms and Conditions

By registering on ScreenSkills you confirm that you are over 18 and agree to the Terms and Conditions, Cookies Policy and Privacy Policy.

ScreenSkills Privacy Notice

ScreenSkills ('we', 'us') complies with General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) and any other applicable data protection legislation in the UK. We take your privacy very seriously and will only use your personal information to administer your record and to provide services you have requested from us.

We will use this personal information you provide us to create your account on the ScreenSkills website, deliver relevant services, maintain your records and, if you agree and subscribe, to send you marketing information in the form of newsletters and e-mailshots containing details and information about ScreenSkills programmes, events and other relevant activity.

ScreenSkills will sometimes share your information with our partner companies, with whom we are jointly delivering specific project or a scheme (e.g. BFI). No other third parties will be given access to your personal data unless required by law to do so.

We have appropriate security measures in place allowing only relevant staff to access and process your personal information via secure IT systems and internal processes. We will only retain your information for appropriate amount of time which is in line with our Records Retention Policy (as a way of an example, HRMC related records for six years + one current year).

We may transfer your personal information outside of UK and European Economic Area (EEA) countries. We meet our obligations under GDPR by ensuring that the information has equivalent protection as if it were being held within the EEA (e.g. EU-US Privacy Shield Framework).

For more information explaining how we use your information please see ScreenSkills' Privacy Policy, Cookies Policy and Terms and Conditions.

If you have any questions relating to our data protection practices, please get in touch with ScreenSkills Data Protection Officer(s): data.protection@screenskills.com

For the purposes outlined above and according to the ScreenSkills Privacy Policy, I consent to this provision of my personal information for processing and storage.



Thank you for filling in this form. We want our screen industries to be inclusive and welcoming to everyone – if there is more we could do to improve your experience, please get in touch be emailing us at: hiive@screenskills.com or by direct messaging us on Facebook or Twitter.